#100DaysofFanFavorites | Day 72

25 Inimitable Men 22/25 
Rufus Carlin (Timeless)

Timeless

Are you watching Timeless because if not, here’s your one-millionth plug to do so. Quite frankly, you know a show is outstanding when two of their characters climb up your seemingly endless list of favorites and you need to tell the world about how great they are even though you’ve only known them for a year. Rufus Carlin is Timeless’ brave pilot, but really he is more so their genius extraordinaire with the most perfect speeches to give reminding viewers of just how dark and horrible our world is in the present, and in our history. But beyond that, Rufus’ kindness is unparalleled, his bravery and integrity along with his loyalty to his friends has stood out gorgeously in every episode allowing him to be the kind of light every TV show needs. Continue reading

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Timeless 1×16 “The Red Scare” Recap

Spoilers Ahead

What the Rittenhouse?

Episode Summary | Time in History: DC, 1954 — the big Rittenhouse summit. When the Time Team follows Flynn back in time, Jiya must accompany them to help Rufus, but since it isn’t built for more than three people, something messes with her psyche. Lucy and Wyatt find her Grandpa then convince him to work as a double agent within Rittenhouse. Mason chooses a side. Wyatt almost says goodbye. And Lucy’s mom drops the biggest bombshell of all.

We’re never going to stop telling you that Timeless is the most exciting show on TV right now. And though it is only in its freshman season, it’s safe to assume the series is headed towards greater places because of what it has already done. Its portrayal of the horrors in America have been done with such poignant accuracy, it’s astounding how the series doesn’t shy away from topics that are either glossed over or treated as taboo. In its first season’s final episode, “The Red Scare”, Timeless gave its viewers the opportunity to see the true horrors of the 50s while showcasing the growth that’s already taken place today.

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Timeless 1×15 “Public Enemy No. 1” Review

Spoilers Ahead

Coming soon to a theater near you: The Untouchables: A Remake starring Connery, Costner, and Robert De Niro like you’ve never seen them before.

Episode Summary | Time in History: Chicago, 1931. Al Capone. Eliot Ness. And Capone’s brother? Who even knew he had a brother? I surely didn’t. But that doesn’t stop our heroes from finding every opportunity they can to make sure Capone gets what he deserves after Ness (Misha Collins) is shot and killed. As we all know, originally he’s the one who brings Capone in. The team’s place was far from what actually occurred, but because Flynn jumped, they couldn’t save Lucy’s sister as they attempted to. But it’s the way the episode ended that’s left me propelling in search of a time machine to next Monday.

In the season’s penultimate episode, Timeless once again explored the convoluted topic of fate vs. free will. And on top of that it’s created yet another riveting episode with its impeccable focus on detail. Who else wishes this show was around when they were in High School? And for those who are, you’re lucky. That said, “Public Enemy No. 1” was strong for a number of reasons, but its focus on detail floored me. Its execution of friendships equating to family floored me. And because this was the season’s penultimate, we’ll be changing up the format to discuss a little bit more than the usual performer/scene of the week.

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Timeless 1×14 “The Lost Generation” Review

Spoilers Ahead

The roaring 20’s — the smell of adventure?

Episode Summary | Time in History: Ernest Hemingway, Josephine Baker, and Charles Lindergh. Timeless knows what it’s doing with these guest stars — Brandan Barash, Tiffany Daniels, and Jesse Luken were outstanding. That said, in “The Lost Generation”, our heroes took a trip to the May 21, 1927: Paris, France once again following Flynn on his quest to destroy Rittenhouse. Only Wyatt was still in detention and replaced by Bam Bam — he tragically doesn’t make it back from the past though. (This is why we break the rules, buddy!) Agent Christopher is replaced and the team, now officially reunited with Wyatt, go rogue in order to fight Rittenhouse? Can we call them Rogue Four? No? Okay, that’s cool.

Timeless’ play on fate vs. free will has become the most enthralling part of the series layering the characters beautifully in ways only such a theme could. If Lucy comes from a long line of ancestors who were a part of Rittenhouse, does that mean she needs to join it? Is it truly her fate or could she make the choice to rewrite her supposed future? And in exploring this concept, the series ties each of the characters together in ways that feel incredibly organic. In Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms he states that, “the world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.” And right now, our Time Team is at that broken place — stronger than they’ve ever been, but concurrently destroyed.

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Timeless 1×13 “Karma Chameleon” Review

Spoilers Ahead 

The 80s was best for music, but I don’t think I’m down with the fashion.

Episode Summary | Time in History: The 80s — the good ol’ days. The time where people didn’t want to be forgotten. They wanted their finest hours celebrated. The time where they wanted to bless the rains in Africa. But the real question is, is Will Byers missing at this time or no? Oh, wait, wrong show. It’s easy to confuse two really great shows isn’t it? On a more serious note, this week’s Timeless didn’t actually take us back to a significant point in our history, but rather Wyatt’s — more so Jessica’s, but the point is clear. Thankfully, this week Wyatt didn’t have murder on his mind, but rather a Back to the Future reversal. And one I can actually agree with: stop a one night stand in order to prevent a serial killer’s birth.

However, as we all know, things are never that easy, and as much as Wyatt’s plan was practical, it’s safe to assume that a lot of us knew it wouldn’t bring Jessica back. Nevertheless the showcase of teamwork has been superlative. And if all falls apart from this moment on at least we know that the A-Team Time Team will always have each other’s backs. Also, hopefully the lesson has been learned, and the team won’t travel without Lucy anymore.

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Timeless 1×11 “The World’s Columbian Exposition” Review

Spoilers Ahead 

And this is an example of a remarkable winter premiere.

Time in History (Episode Summary): After Flynn took Lucy captive at the end of “The Capture of Benedict Arnold”, Wyatt and Rufus set out to bring her home. Still filled with the desire to erase Rittenhouse from existence, Flynn takes them to the time where Harry Houdini was just getting started — Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. An undercover H.H. Holmes sets a thick, oxygen-eliminating trap for Wyatt and Rufus. There’s a reunion. There’s a happy conversation. There’s a victory. But in the end we’re left with what can change the course of a character’s life forever.

Welcome to the very first installment of our Timeless reviews. We just couldn’t stay away from this show. (I tried, I really did.) Here’s how these will work, each week I’ll be choosing a performer and a moment. Some weeks, like this week, each actor will get their time. They’re too good, and essentially why I want to write about Timeless — Rufus, Wyatt, and Lucy are special. And “The World’s Columbian Exposition” was yet another wonderful showcase of the fact that this team is in it for the long haul. Together, they’ve built something more exquisite than a time machine, and no matter how ugly it gets, they’ll always come home to each other.

“Fear isn’t actually happening. It’s just your reaction to it.”

The reason each member of the Time Team deserves their own segment this week is due to how poignantly fear attempted to puppet-master their lives. And in overcoming it, it wasn’t entirely absent, but rather their choices to react differently towards it paved the road towards their mission’s victory. No matter how temporary, for a moment, everything will be alright.

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